Loyola Student Dispatch

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Posts Tagged ‘Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing’

Loyola “tops off” new medical research center

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on June 12, 2014

A crane places the last beam atop Loyola's new medical research center. Loyola University Chicago photo.

A crane places the last beam atop Loyola’s new medical research center.
Loyola University Chicago photo.

By Loyola Student Dispatch Staff

The last beam has been put in place atop Loyola University Chicago’s new Center for Translational Research and Education in Maywood.

The university held a “topping off” ceremony this week on the $137 million project, which will include a  laboratory and support space for 72 principal investigators plus space for 40 lead scientists engaged in desktop research such as public health, health services, nursing, bioinformatics and epidemiology.

Interior work will continue on the five-story building, which is slated to open April 2016.

Here is a news release from the university:

On June 9th, construction workers topped off Loyola University Chicago’s $137 million medical research and education building.

Iron workers signed their names and attached an American flag to the final beam to be placed in the Center for Translational Research and Education. A crane hoisted the beam, which workers secured to the top floor of the five-story building.

Construction of the center began in August, 2013. The center is on schedule to open in April, 2016 on the university’s Health Sciences Campus in Maywood.

The 227,000-square-foot building is a collaboration among Loyola University Chicago, Loyola University Health System and CHE-Trinity Health. The center will support nearly 500 scientists and staff working together to improve human health.

The center will include bench laboratory and support space for 72 principal investigators plus space for 40 lead scientists engaged in desktop research such as public health, health services, nursing, bioinformatics and epidemiology. A 250-seat auditorium will provide a link with the local community, serving primarily as a showcase for health-related programming.

The center will accommodate principal investigators, postdoctoral trainees, physicians, nurses, residents, fellows, graduate students and students from Loyola University Chicago’s Stritch School of Medicine and Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing.

Researchers now scattered among buildings throughout the Health Sciences Campus will be centralized in the research and education center. The center is located between the Maguire office building and Loyola’s Stritch School of Medicine.

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Loyola surgery unit one of nation’s best funded

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on January 7, 2014

index

By Loyola Student Dispatch Staff

The Surgery Department of Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine is ranked one of the top-funded surgery departments in the nation, according to a prestigious study.

Here is the news release:

The Surgery Department of Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine ranked No. 18 in the nation in National Institutes of Health medical school funding in 2013, according to the Blue Ridge Institute for Medical Research.

Researchers in Loyola’s Surgery Department received a total of $5,068,582 in NIH funding.

“Loyola Surgery is committed to excellence and innovation in research that will help define the future of American surgery,” said Paul C. Kuo, MD, MS, MBA, FACS, chair of the Department of Surgery. “We greatly appreciate government funding that makes such research possible.”

NIH funding from all Loyola departments combined totaled $18,986,909, the Blue Ridge Institute said. The Blue Ridge Institute, a nonprofit organization based in North Carolina, is a recognized source for NIH funding statistics.

Here are 2013 NIH funding for other Loyola departments, according to the Blue Ridge Institute:

Anatomy/cell biology: $370,320
Biochemistry: $29,173
Internal medicine/medicine: $1,447,390
Microbiology/immunology/virology: $4,836,003
Obstetrics/genecology: $137,176
Orthopaedics: $217,063
Pathology: $1,234,762
Pharmacology: $1,135,555
Physiology: $2,865,807
Public health and preventive medicine: $1,645,078

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Nursing students honored at Loyola ceremony

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on December 27, 2013

Loyola photo.

Loyola photo.

By Loyola Student Dispatch Staff

Graduating students of Loyola University Chicago’s Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing were recognized for their outstanding achievements at the school’s recent Honors and Pinning ceremony.

Here is a news release from the university:

Loyola University Chicago Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing welcomed graduating students into the nursing profession at its recent Honors and Pinning ceremony  at the Health Sciences Campus in Maywood.

The event honored graduating nursing students and recognized the outstanding achievements of student award recipients. Each nursing student was presented with a pin from a member of Loyola’s Alumni Board.

“The Honors and Pinning Ceremony is a long-standing tradition, which represents the transition from student to nurse,” said Vicki Keough, PhD, APRN-BC, ACNP, FAAN, dean, MNSON. “This event also brings together alumni, faculty, staff, students and their families to celebrate the health care profession and identify our next generation of health care providers as recipients of a world-class Loyola University Chicago education.”

The following awards and honors were presented during the ceremony:

Alumni Award: Meredith Kiefer
Laura Difiglio Klink Scholarship: Rachel Johnson
Gladys Kiniery Clinical Excellence Award: Jessica Chakos
Carol Kraft Award: Faith Obichere
Julia Lane Silver Key Award: Annalisa Graham
Dean’s Gold Key Award: Nataliya Malimon

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Loyola nursing school gets $2.5 million in grants

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on October 21, 2013

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Loyola University Chicago’s Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing has received two grants to serve the underprivileged and others in need of health care services.

The grants total more than $2.5 million.

Here is a release from the university:

Loyola University Chicago Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing (MNSON) has received two grants from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) to foster interprofessional education and collaboration to better meet the health needs of the community.

The first was an Interprofessional Promoting Access to Healthcare (I-PATH) grant (HRSA # D09HP25925) awarded to professor Ida Androwich, PhD, RN-BC, FAAN, FHIMSS. She will receive $1.05 million over three years to engage nursing students in inter-professional education and clinical practice projects with dietetics and public health students.

Students will develop interprofessional team projects to address the health-care needs of patients with multiple chronic conditions in minority or underserved areas. Their projects and other resources for conducting community assessments will be available on a web site to support small or rural health-care facilities in completing community health-needs assessments and to provide better care for their populations.

“There is a critical need for nursing leaders educationally prepared to engage in and direct inter-professional teams to improve the quality of patient care,” Dr. Androwich said. “This grant will allow us to educate a variety of health professionals and improve interprofessional collaboration.”

Faculty members who assisted with the grant include: MaryMargaret Sharp-Pucci, EdD, MPH; Joanne Kouba, PhD, RD, LDN; Fran Vlasses, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, ANEF, FAAN; Holly Kramer, MD; Sheila Haas, PhD, RN, FAAN; and Patricia Friend, PhD, APN-CNS, AOCN.

The second was an Interprofessional-Collaborative Redesign and Evaluation for Population Access to Health (I-CARE PATH) grant (HRSA # UD7HP26040) awarded to associate professor Fran Vlasses, PhD, RN, NEA-BC,ANEF, FAAN. Dr. Vlasses will receive $1.5 million over three years to develop nurse leaders to create collaborative environments to better care for patients in underserved areas.

“This grant will substantially increase the number of nursing, dietetics, social work and medical students who are prepared for interprofessional collaborative practice environments which increase access, coordinate care and promote health in the community,” Dr. Vlasses said.

Loyola’s Health Sciences Division faculty members who assisted with the grant include: Diana Hackbarth, PhD, RN, FAAN; Elizabeth Burkhart, PhD, RN, MPH; Aaron Michelfelder, MD, FAAFP, FAAMA; Joanne Kouba, PhD, RD, LDN; and Sheila Haas, PhD, RN, FAAN.

These grants are in line with the Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing’s progressive approach to education focused on collaboration. The school recently built a state-of-the-art Center for Simulation Education, which includes a six-bed virtual hospital and home-care environment where students from various health disciplines learn together how to better care for patients. In addition, the school has developed and managed an interprofessional school-based health center at Proviso High School in Maywood for more than a decade.

“These grants support the school’s efforts to foster education and collaboration across many health-care disciplines,” said Vicki Keough, PhD, APRN-BC, ACNP, FAAN, dean, MNSON. “This work will allow us to better serve our changing health-care environment.”

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Emanuel lauds Loyola for accepting undocumented immigrants

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on June 14, 2013

Loyola Stritch photo.

Loyola Stritch photo.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is lauding Loyola University Chicago’s Stritch School of Medicine for becoming the first medical school in the nation to accept applications from undocumented immigrants.

Stritch decided to accept undocumented students after President Barack Obama signed an order to allow young adults brought to the United States as children to temporarily live and work here legally, Crain’s Chicago Business first reported.

Stritch says on its website that the decision also is fitting with Loyola’s Jesuit value of social justice.

“Loyola University’s decision to become the first medical school in the country to allow undocumented students to apply and attend is one more way Chicago is becoming the most immigrant friendly city in the country.  As the University attracts more of the best and brightest to Chicago, they will help shape our city, as immigrants have done in every generation,” Emanuel said in a statement.” With our support for the DREAM act and efforts to promote immigrant businesses and citizenship, we are creating more opportunities for immigrants to pursue their dreams. By accepting undocumented students, Loyola will provide families and students across the country a better chance to achieve the American dream in Chicago, the most American of American Cities. Loyola’s decision is true to our values as a city and will help create value for our city for generations to come.”

Read the entire Crain’s Chicago Business article here:  MEDICAL SCHOOL

Here is an announcement from Loyola University Chicago’s Stritch School of Medicine:

The Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine is pleased to invite applications from qualified persons with DACA immigration status or who are DACA-eligible. These students join U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents as eligible for admission to Loyola Stritch School of Medicine.  Application for admission may be made concurrent with pursuit of DACA status; matriculation requires completion of the process and conferral of deferred action from the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). As a Jesuit and Catholic educational institution, we strive to be a welcoming and supportive environment that welcomes qualified DREAMers to join their peers and achieve their full potential in serving others as physicians. Moreover, it is simply in the interest of the medical profession and the people we serve to utilize the talents of qualified students of this immigration status. We call upon our peers in the medical education community to also extend opportunities to these students and to advocate for reforms of the United States immigration system that would remove the remaining barriers and uncertainties confronting this category of students.

  1. What is DACA Status? On June 15, 2012, President Obama announced the creation of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.  This program allows some young persons who are classified as undocumented immigrants to receive a two-year, renewable authorization to remain and work within the United States. These young persons are commonly called “DREAMers” after the proposed federal legislation, the DREAM Act (Development, Relief and Education of Alien Minors Act). DREAMers were brought to the United States as children and have been raised and been educated in this country. They are Americans in every way except lack citizenship status. “They are Americans in their heart, in their minds, in every single way but one: on paper.” (1)In order to obtain DACA-status, DREAMers must meet certain criteria including that they were brought to the United States before the age of sixteen but are not older than thirty-one years of age, have achieved particular levels of education or military service, and not have been convicted of a felony or have a problematic record of misdemeanors  (For a full list of criteria, click here) Students who are granted DACA status are issued an Employment Authorization Document (also known as a work permit) and can apply for a Social Security number from the Social Security Administration.
  2. Why Has Loyola Stritch School of Medicine Expanded Eligibility to this Category of Students? The Loyola Stritch School of Medicine welcomes DREAMers who are DACA-eligible for three main reasons:
    1. Our Jesuit & Catholic Values – As a Catholic university that is sponsored by the Society of Jesus (the Jesuits), we firmly believe in the dignity of each person and in the promotion of social justice. The dignity or worth of persons calls us to steward the talents of qualified applicants rather than reject their contributions for arbitrary and arcane reasons. Social justice requires that we foster the conditions for full participation in the community by all members of our community. These young people who meet the criteria for DACA status are typically woven into the fabric of our communities and have a basic right to contribute to the fullest extent of their abilities. Our approach echoes a long tradition articulated by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) of advocacy for immigrant members of our communities. (2) (3) (4)
    2. The Interests of the Medical Profession and Medical Education – A diverse medical workforce is very important to the health of our communities for reasons that are well-known.  Physicians who share ethnic, cultural or racial backgrounds with underserved patients are more likely to choose to serve those underserved populations, produce improved outcomes, and can become role models within the community. In addition, it is desirable that all physicians develop a level of cultural sensitivity and competence. Training side-by-side in a diverse student body can foster understanding of persons and cultures different from one’s own. Thus, increasing diversity benefits all students.DREAMers represent a potential source of qualified and diverse talent that will be an asset to the medical education environment, the medical profession, and patients. These young people are often bi-cultural, bi-lingual, and possess insight into the immigrant experience. In a nation that has a large immigrant population, these young people can help to foster the ability of the physician workforce to treat the array of patients they will encounter in their practices.
    3. DACA status removes a long-standing barrier to securing a residency slot – Medical school graduates who have DACA status will be eligible to gain a state license to practice medicine and thereby enter a residency training program. Prior to the creation of the DACA program, any DREAMer who graduated medical school would be unable to secure a work authorization and a social security number. Thus, he or she would be unable to gain a license to practice medicine and enter residency training. Medical schools understandably had been reluctant to accept and educate students who would not be able to treat patients. Such a situation would consume significant resources of the educational institution without meeting its goal, namely to produce physicians to serve the community’s patient populations. As this barrier is no longer an insurmountable obstacle, it is incumbent upon medical schools to evaluate DREAMers for admission based on their qualifications and potential, not their immigration status.
  3. Barriers that confront DREAMers and Loyola Stritch School of Medicine’s response The immediate obstacle that DREAMers face after acceptance to medical school is financing their medical education. Students with DACA status remain ineligible for most federal benefits including federally-guaranteed student loans.  Such loans often comprise an important part of a medical student’s financial aid package. Of course all students at a private university such as Loyola are eligible for aid from the university including scholarships.The Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine is presently pursuing a number of financial aid options for students who have received deferred action. We remain hopeful that highly qualified applicants will achieve a financing package comparable to students who are U.S. citizens. The package can potentially combine school-based aid and alternative loans that are similar to federally-guaranteed loans in their terms. We hope to be able to provide more specific information in the coming months.The longer term concern for students with DACA status is the stability of the deferred action program.  It is a status created by the executive branch of government and thereby subject to change in a new Presidential administration. As a two-year renewable status, it cannot provide the recipient with the long-term security that comes with a path to citizenship.  However, we believe to use this concern to further delay the opportunities for medical education to DREAMers is to perpetuate existing injustices. The uncertain future of the DACA program is a concern that should motivate the medical profession and medical education community to advocate for a path to citizenship for DREAMers.  This path would be in the interest of medicine and the patients we serve.

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Loyola medical school accepting undocumented immigrants

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on June 13, 2013

Loyola Stritch photo.

Loyola Stritch photo.

Loyola University Chicago’s Stritch School of Medicine is now accepting applications from undocumented immigrants, Crain’s Chicago Business reports.

Stritch decided to accept undocumented students after President Barack Obama signed an order to allow young adults brought to the United States as children to temporarily live and work here legally, Crain’s reports.

Stritch says on its website that the decision also is fitting with Loyola’s Jesuit value of social justice.

Read the entire Crain’s article here:  MEDICAL SCHOOL

Here is an announcement from Loyola University Chicago’s Stritch School of Medicine:

The Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine is pleased to invite applications from qualified persons with DACA immigration status or who are DACA-eligible. These students join U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents as eligible for admission to Loyola Stritch School of Medicine.  Application for admission may be made concurrent with pursuit of DACA status; matriculation requires completion of the process and conferral of deferred action from the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). As a Jesuit and Catholic educational institution, we strive to be a welcoming and supportive environment that welcomes qualified DREAMers to join their peers and achieve their full potential in serving others as physicians. Moreover, it is simply in the interest of the medical profession and the people we serve to utilize the talents of qualified students of this immigration status. We call upon our peers in the medical education community to also extend opportunities to these students and to advocate for reforms of the United States immigration system that would remove the remaining barriers and uncertainties confronting this category of students.

  1. What is DACA Status?
    On June 15, 2012, President Obama announced the creation of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.  This program allows some young persons who are classified as undocumented immigrants to receive a two-year, renewable authorization to remain and work within the United States. These young persons are commonly called “DREAMers” after the proposed federal legislation, the DREAM Act (Development, Relief and Education of Alien Minors Act). DREAMers were brought to the United States as children and have been raised and been educated in this country. They are Americans in every way except lack citizenship status. “They are Americans in their heart, in their minds, in every single way but one: on paper.” (1)In order to obtain DACA-status, DREAMers must meet certain criteria including that they were brought to the United States before the age of sixteen but are not older than thirty-one years of age, have achieved particular levels of education or military service, and not have been convicted of a felony or have a problematic record of misdemeanors  (For a full list of criteria, click here) Students who are granted DACA status are issued an Employment Authorization Document (also known as a work permit) and can apply for a Social Security number from the Social Security Administration.
  2. Why Has Loyola Stritch School of Medicine Expanded Eligibility to this Category of Students?
    The Loyola Stritch School of Medicine welcomes DREAMers who are DACA-eligible for three main reasons:

    1. Our Jesuit & Catholic Values – As a Catholic university that is sponsored by the Society of Jesus (the Jesuits), we firmly believe in the dignity of each person and in the promotion of social justice. The dignity or worth of persons calls us to steward the talents of qualified applicants rather than reject their contributions for arbitrary and arcane reasons. Social justice requires that we foster the conditions for full participation in the community by all members of our community. These young people who meet the criteria for DACA status are typically woven into the fabric of our communities and have a basic right to contribute to the fullest extent of their abilities. Our approach echoes a long tradition articulated by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) of advocacy for immigrant members of our communities. (2) (3) (4)
    2. The Interests of the Medical Profession and Medical Education – A diverse medical workforce is very important to the health of our communities for reasons that are well-known.  Physicians who share ethnic, cultural or racial backgrounds with underserved patients are more likely to choose to serve those underserved populations, produce improved outcomes, and can become role models within the community. In addition, it is desirable that all physicians develop a level of cultural sensitivity and competence. Training side-by-side in a diverse student body can foster understanding of persons and cultures different from one’s own. Thus, increasing diversity benefits all students.DREAMers represent a potential source of qualified and diverse talent that will be an asset to the medical education environment, the medical profession, and patients. These young people are often bi-cultural, bi-lingual, and possess insight into the immigrant experience. In a nation that has a large immigrant population, these young people can help to foster the ability of the physician workforce to treat the array of patients they will encounter in their practices.
    3. DACA status removes a long-standing barrier to securing a residency slot – Medical school graduates who have DACA status will be eligible to gain a state license to practice medicine and thereby enter a residency training program. Prior to the creation of the DACA program, any DREAMer who graduated medical school would be unable to secure a work authorization and a social security number. Thus, he or she would be unable to gain a license to practice medicine and enter residency training. Medical schools understandably had been reluctant to accept and educate students who would not be able to treat patients. Such a situation would consume significant resources of the educational institution without meeting its goal, namely to produce physicians to serve the community’s patient populations. As this barrier is no longer an insurmountable obstacle, it is incumbent upon medical schools to evaluate DREAMers for admission based on their qualifications and potential, not their immigration status.
  3. Barriers that confront DREAMers and Loyola Stritch School of Medicine’s response
    The immediate obstacle that DREAMers face after acceptance to medical school is financing their medical education. Students with DACA status remain ineligible for most federal benefits including federally-guaranteed student loans.  Such loans often comprise an important part of a medical student’s financial aid package. Of course all students at a private university such as Loyola are eligible for aid from the university including scholarships.The Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine is presently pursuing a number of financial aid options for students who have received deferred action. We remain hopeful that highly qualified applicants will achieve a financing package comparable to students who are U.S. citizens. The package can potentially combine school-based aid and alternative loans that are similar to federally-guaranteed loans in their terms. We hope to be able to provide more specific information in the coming months.The longer term concern for students with DACA status is the stability of the deferred action program.  It is a status created by the executive branch of government and thereby subject to change in a new Presidential administration. As a two-year renewable status, it cannot provide the recipient with the long-term security that comes with a path to citizenship.  However, we believe to use this concern to further delay the opportunities for medical education to DREAMers is to perpetuate existing injustices. The uncertain future of the DACA program is a concern that should motivate the medical profession and medical education community to advocate for a path to citizenship for DREAMers.  This path would be in the interest of medicine and the patients we serve.

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Loyola intern teaches kids to eat healthy

Posted by keaganhynes on March 3, 2013

By Keagan Hynes

A Loyola University Chicago intern is teaching suburban high school kids how to make healthy choices when it comes to snacking.

The intern, Sara Casey, was awarded one of the 25 Kids Eat Right grants and will be giving presentations at Proviso East High School in Maywood to over 200 students about making healthier decisions when they snack.

Casey works as a dietician intern with the Loyola University Chicago Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing’s school-based health center at Proviso East, which provides helps students and faculty have access to health care that they might not get outside school.

The full story can be found here:

“Newswise — MAYWOOD, Ill. – Students at Proviso East High School will soon have the opportunity to learn about the importance of healthy snacking during National Nutrition Month in March. Loyola University Chicago dietetic intern, Sara Casey, will reach more than 200 students on Monday, March 11, with classroom presentations on healthy snacks to help students feel and perform their best.

Casey recently earned one of 25 Kids Eat Right grants from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Foundation for the presentations. Kids Eat Right is designed to ensure that sound nutrition recommendations are part of childhood obesity prevention. Casey will work with Kelly Sierra, RD, LDN, registered dietitian with Loyola University Chicago to develop the presentations.

“Many students at Proviso East rely on snack foods throughout the day, because they often skip breakfast and lunch,” Sierra said. “Encouraging students to replace unhealthy snacks with fresh fruit, vegetables, nuts and granola bars will help them get the nutrients they are missing.”

Casey and Sierra are involved with Loyola University Chicago Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing’s school-based health center (SBHC) at Proviso East. Loyola dietetic interns, and nursing, medical and social work students work side-by-side with faculty at the facility to develop skills that enhance community health.

The school-based health center was established more than a decade ago to give teens in this underserved area access to health care. Since its inception, thousands of students have received primary health care, school physicals, immunizations and social work, mental health, nutrition and laboratory services at the center.

“The school-based health center provides easy access to health care and education for students who might not otherwise receive treatment and preventive services,” said Diana Hackbarth, PhD, RN, FAAN, professor and SBHC project director, Loyola’s Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing. “These resources have helped students thrive both inside and outside of the classroom.””

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Loyola goes on attack against flu outbreak

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on January 15, 2013

Loyola University Health System is taking an aggressive approach to the flu epidemic by employing  a new machine that can diagnose the illness in little more than an hour.Testing traditionally takes so long that people are already over the flu before they even knew they had it.But Loyola is using a new federally approved machine to diagnose the flu in about an hour, leading to faster treatment.

Here is a portion of the story from the Chicago Tribune:

Laboratory testing for the flu has traditionally taken so long to yield results that most people recovered before finding out if they actually had the virus.

But about half a dozen Chicago-area hospitals can now diagnose influenza in just more than an hour through a federally approved machine that has been working overtime during what is shaping up as a horrendous season for the flu.

“If you don’t have this test, then you’re just guessing what the best thing to do could be,” said Paul Schreckenberger, Loyola University Health System’s authority on the FilmArray Respiratory Panel.

A faster and more accurate diagnosis can lead to more effective treatment.

“It is important for the physician to know what they’re dealing with,” Schreckenberger said. “They can’t just look at the patient or read their symptoms.”

The screening device — the second of its type to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration — tests a nasal sample for 17 types of viruses and three kinds of bacteria. Among them are key indicators of the flu that on Friday was classified as an epidemic by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The automated machine speeds up a diagnostic process that could otherwise take up to a week under different methods. Most hospitals send patient samples to commercial laboratories, where technicians either grow the virus or check for it using their own technology.

To read the entire Tribune story, click here: FLU

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Students cloudy on Loyola’s cloud computing system

Posted by gjohnson7 on November 26, 2012

By Gabe Johnson

Loyola University Chicago is sky-high on its new cloud computing storage system for students and faculty. But many students are already using cloud-based services other than Loyola’s new LUC Box.

Loyola recently announced its own cloud-based file storage system. The service, coined LUC Box, allows students to create, store, and share up to 10 GB of files from any web-enabled device, streamlining students ability to access files.

However, some students wonder if the university had its head in the clouds, considering that many are already using similar services, such as Google Drive and Dropbox.

“It sounds like a great thing, but I already use other cloud-based services like Google Drive to keep all my papers and schoolwork,” said Greer Campbell, 20, a junior anthropology major.

Others were not even aware of the service.

“I didn’t even know about it. I doubt I’ll ever be using it though.” said Fify Francis, 20, a junior nursing student.

Again, many students think it’s a great idea, but that it didn’t come at a practical time.

“I think it’s a really cool service that Loyola is providing, cloud-based services are really great. However  I more than likely won’t be using it because I am already using Dropbox and Google Drive to store all my documents,” said Mikey Dienstbach, 21, a junior psychology major.

However, Christine Malke, 23, a junior philosophy major and a daily commuter felt otherwise.

“I didn’t know about it, but I definitely think it will be useful for commuters like me,” Malke said. ” It will make my life a lot easier.”

Still, it seems as though the majority of students will not be using the new application.

“I honestly didn’t even know about it. I feel like they’re a little late to the game though. So many students are already using other applications that are more streamlined into their internet experience,”  said Dusko Simic, 20, a junior chemistry major. “It just doesn’t make much sense to use another program at this point.”

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Loyola offers cloud-based storage to students

Posted by gjohnson7 on October 26, 2012

By Gabe Johnson

The Unified Student Government Association (USGA) and Information Technology Services (ITS) at Loyola University Chicago  announced that students will now have access a cloud-based file storage system.

The service, coined LUC Box, allows students to create, store, and share up to 10 GB of files from any web-enabled device, streamlining students ability to access files.

Here’s the full announcement:

The Unified Student Government Association (USGA) and Information Technology Services (ITS) are excited to announce a new cloud-based file storage service available to Loyola faculty, staff, and students. The service, called LUC Box, provides a simple, secure way to create, store, and share files and folders in the cloud (in other words, via the Internet). LUC Box can help you consolidate your documents in a single location, making them easily accessible from anywhere, on any device. You can create files and folders, share them using a direct link, invite others to collaborate, and continue to revise and review your content.

More specifically, LUC Box provides:

  • Cloud Storage—10 GB of cloud-based storage for all Loyola faculty, staff, and students
  • Simple File Management—Store and organize documents, media, and other content online so you can access it from anywhere, anytime, and on any device
  • Secure File Sharing and Collaboration—Share files with anyone, inside or outside Loyola
  • Mobile Access—Access, share, and collaborate using any web-enabled tablet or smart device

Signing up is simple. Visit LUC.box.com and follow the on-screen prompts. Your LUC Box account will be created immediately using your UVID credentials.

LUC Box provides an alternative to existing personal and departmental shared drives, and can make it easier to collaborate and access documents from anywhere on any device. Please note, however, that existing policies regarding sensitive data also apply to cloud-storage services. It is never acceptable to store Loyola Protected data on any cloud service. This includes data such as grades, social security numbers, private correspondence, classified research, etc. We invite you to review Loyola’s Cloud Computing Policy for additional information.

To learn more about cloud storage via the LUC Box, please visit our introductory page. If you have questions or need further support, please contact the ITS help desk at 773.508.4ITS or helpdesk@luc.edu.

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