Loyola Student Dispatch

Bringing Breaking News to Loyola University Chicago

Posts Tagged ‘loyola university health system’

Loyola to Host 3rd Annual Health, Hope & Heroes 5K Run/Walk and Children’s Hero Hustle

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on April 3, 2014

 by Mariah Evely

 

The Loyola University Chicago will host its Third Annual Health, Hope and Heroes 5K Run/Walk and Children’s Hero Hustle on Sunday, June 8 at 9 a.m. on the shared campus of the Loyola University Medical Center and Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital at 2160 S. First Ave. in Maywood, Ill. rmch_3spot_2_07

After the race will by the Children’s Hero Hustle at 10:30 a.m. Mascots from the area will be available to entertain kids as they race. Children ages 4 and younger will run a 50-yard dash; children ages 5 and older will run a 100-yard dash. Kids’ activities will also be held at the finish line area from 9-11:30 a.m.

For more information about the race, the heroes and to donate click here.

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College applications for Loyola rise over the last year

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on February 25, 2014

by Mariah Evely

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Loyola University Chicago saw a 22 percent increase in college applications over the past year, according to ChicagoBusiness.com. The university has invested over $500 million in recent years on new or renovated facilities and continues to spend money to improve campus life.

The following is from ChicagoBusiness.com:

“Students are coming here and having a great experience,” said Paul Roberts, Loyola’s associate provost. “There’s been a tremendous focus on the student experience and making sure they complete their degree in four years.”

To read the rest of the article from ChicagoBusiness.com click here.

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American Heart Associations awards Loyola $438,740

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on February 20, 2014

by Mariah Evely

logo-charity-loyola-stritch-300x218The American Heart Association has awarded Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine $438,740 for cardiac research in 2013, totaling a sum of $10.6 million the organization has donated to Loyola over time.

The Heart Association has funded 122 studies at Loyola since 1984.

Loyola provides complete heart and vascular care, ranging from pioneering the latest technology to teaching heart-healthy lifestyles. For 11 years in a row, World Report and U.S. News has named Loyola as one of the top 50 hospitals nationwide for heart surgery and cardiology. Loyola is ranked 20th in the nation in the current rankings.

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Loyola professor receives prestigious Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on January 24, 2014

by Mariah Evely

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Katherine Radek, PhD, of Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, was awarded a prestigious Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

The PECASE is the highest award the U.S. government bestows on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their research careers, Dr. Radek is among 102 researchers to receive the honor.

To read more about Dr. Radek and the award bestowed upon her click here.

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Loyola expert believes E-Cigarettes Encourage Youth to try Nicotine

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on January 24, 2014

by Mariah Evely

E Cigarettes Become Popular Alternative

Philip McAndrew, MD, is a physician and smoking cessation expert at Loyola University Health System as well as an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

“As physicians we have seen progress in getting kids not to smoke, but with e-cigarettes we are seeing the numbers rise. In 2011-2012 twice as many middle and high school students tried e-cigarettes. They are new, they are techy and seem fun. E-cigarettes are a real danger because not only can they lead to addiction to nicotine, with no FDA regulation we don’t now all the other chemicals in e-cigarettes that could cause harm. And, they are most easily accessible to kids,” said McAndrew in a Newswise article.

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Lake Shore Campus Wellness Center moves to new location

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on January 21, 2014

by Mariah Evely 12b3eaaad5f84782b69c606eb73dede5

The Lake Shore Campus Wellness Center has moved to the Granada Center, Third Floor, 6439 N. Sheridan Road. The Granada is located next to Felice’s and the Campus Bookstore.

Services will be added at the new location including:

  • Confidential HIV testing, with results in five minutes
  • A self-service immunization module, which allows you to enter your immunization data into LOCUS and print copies of your immunization records
  • Talk to Tivo-dog therapy outreach-offered weekly at Lake Shore Campus and monthly at Water Tower Campus.
  • Expanded group offerings that meet at both Lake Shore and Water Tower campuses.

For more updated information click here. Appointments can either be made online or through Dial-A-Nurse at 773.508.8883.

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Loyola fields question about new marijuana law

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on January 16, 2014

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By Loyola Student Dispatch Staff

The recent legalization of medical marijuana in Illinois has ignited inquiries to a Loyola University Medical Center.

Here is news release from the university:

Ever since medical marijuana became legal in Illinois Jan. 1, Loyola University Medical Center neurologist and multiple sclerosis specialist Dr. Matthew McCoyd has been inundated with questions from his patients.

The topic typically comes up at the end of the visit, when the patient brings up one last thing: What does Dr. McCoyd think about medical marijuana?

“It’s an extremely common question,” McCoyd said.

There are anecdotal reports that marijuana can relieve pain and spasticity in MS patients, but little evidence from clinical trials that marijuana is effective, McCoyd said. However, he noted that a marijuana-based drug called Sativex has been approved in Britain, Canada and other countries for the treatment of MS spasticity. Sativex is a peppermint-flavored mouth spray. A small pump delivers a precise amount of medicine with each spray. The drug, extracted from cannabis plants, has been shown in clinical trials to be effective.

McCoyd said medical marijuana may be an option for carefully selected MS patients who are Illinois residents. Like any prescription medication, there is a concern for medication abuse, which will have to be considered on case-by-case basis.

McCoyd said medical marijuana could also be prescribed to help relieve muscle spasms in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), often referred to as Lou Gehrig’s disease, another qualifying medical condition under the new law.

On Jan. 1, Illinois began a four-year trial program that will allow patients with MS and certain other conditions to obtain prescriptions for medical marijuana. MS is among the main indications for medical marijuana.

McCoyd said there are differences between medical marijuana and marijuana sold on the street. Medical marijuana has higher concentrations of THC, the compound that provides the drug’s high. Medical marijuana has less THC and higher concentrations of cannabinoid compounds.

McCoyd is an assistant professor in the Department of Neurology of Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

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Loyola, Notre Dame team to battle cancer

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on January 13, 2014

Loyola University Chicago photo.

Loyola University Chicago photo.

By Loyola Student Dispatch Staff

Loyola University Chicago and the University of Notre Dame are teaming to battle cancer.

Here is a new release:

Two research powerhouses, Loyola University Chicago and the University of Notre Dame, are joining forces in a multidisciplinary cancer research collaboration.

The goal of the alliance is to provide direct support for revolutionary new cancer research, with the ultimate objective of making cancer a more manageable, and potentially curable, disease.

“Through this collaboration we will draw on the breadth of our scientific expertise, bringing together the clinical and translational work we do at Loyola with the strong, cutting-edge science research
program at Notre Dame,” said Patrick Stiff, MD, director of Loyola’s Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center. “Our purpose is to spur the discovery and development of innovative new therapies.”

“This will enable world-class investigators and clinicians from different disciplines to hone in on key areas of cancer research,” said M. Sharon Stack, PhD, the Ann F. Dunne and Elizabeth M. Riley Director of the Harper Cancer Research Institute at the University of Notre Dame. “The research we do today is going to set the standard for the future treatment of cancer patients.”

Saint Joseph Regional Medical Center (SJRMC), located in north central Indiana, was instrumental in bringing together Loyola and Notre Dame. Recognized as strong community partners, SJRMC and Notre Dame have long collaborated in multiple areas. The SJRMC and Loyola health systems, both members of CHE Trinity Health, also share an academic affiliation.

“In addition to having robust cancer research programs, all of these organizations also share a foundational Catholic heritage,” said Albert Gutierrez, President and CEO of SJRMC. “We are honored to associate with other institutes that are driven by their values and a mission to serve.”

A total of four $50,000 grants will fund the Loyola-Notre Dame research project. Loyola’s Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center, University of Notre Dame’s Harper Cancer Research Institute and CHE Trinity Health are funding three of the grants. A fourth grant is funded by donors Michael and Estella Cronk of Oak Brook, Ill.

The grants will provide initial funding for four joint research projects:

New weapon against ovarian cancer. Ovarian cancer is silent during early stages, and often is not detected until it is in an advanced stage. Only 20 percent of women diagnosed with late-stage ovarian cancer survive for five years. Ovarian cancer is associated with an overabundance of receptor molecules on the surface of tumor cells. Researchers hope a drug to block the production of one of these receptors may ultimately improve survival in ovarian cancer patients. This grant is funded by Michael and Estella Cronk.

Principal investigators: Maureen Drakes, PhD (Loyola) and M. Sharon Stack, PhD (Notre Dame).

Helping the immune system fight cancer. Various therapies boost the immune system to kill cancer cells. Researchers have identified an interaction between cellular proteins that unfortunately weakens this immune response. Preventing the proteins from interacting is a possible strategy for enhancing cancer immunotherapy.

Principal investigators: Brian M. Baker, PhD, (Notre Dame) and Stephanie K. Watkins, PhD, (Loyola).

A better model to study leukemia. Molecular signals that emanate from the bone marrow help to protect leukemic cells from the lethal effects of chemotherapeutic drugs. This results in drug resistance, and greatly hampers patients’ recovery. Such signaling also attracts cancer cells to the bone marrow, leading to the spread of cancer. However, the detailed molecular features of this signaling are difficult and time-consuming to study with current methods. So researchers are developing a new and more efficient experimental model to study this important molecular signaling pathway.

Principal investigators: Diane Wagner, PhD (Notre Dame); and Jiwang Zhang MD, PhD and Paul Kuo, MD (Loyola).

A Trojan Horse approach to fighting melanoma. An anti-melanoma drug that is effective when applied topically is ineffective when injected, because the cells are able to purge the drug. To disable this defense mechanism, researchers are planning a Trojan Horse approach. They will package the drug inside nanoparticles so that the drug reaches a site inside the cell where it can exert its toxic effect.

Principal investigators: Caroline Le Poole, PhD (Loyola) and Basar Bilgicer, PhD (Notre Dame).

The one-year grants are intended as seed funds for investigators to establish collaborative projects that collect preliminary data needed for a competitive application to a major external funding source.

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Loyola surgery unit one of nation’s best funded

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on January 7, 2014

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By Loyola Student Dispatch Staff

The Surgery Department of Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine is ranked one of the top-funded surgery departments in the nation, according to a prestigious study.

Here is the news release:

The Surgery Department of Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine ranked No. 18 in the nation in National Institutes of Health medical school funding in 2013, according to the Blue Ridge Institute for Medical Research.

Researchers in Loyola’s Surgery Department received a total of $5,068,582 in NIH funding.

“Loyola Surgery is committed to excellence and innovation in research that will help define the future of American surgery,” said Paul C. Kuo, MD, MS, MBA, FACS, chair of the Department of Surgery. “We greatly appreciate government funding that makes such research possible.”

NIH funding from all Loyola departments combined totaled $18,986,909, the Blue Ridge Institute said. The Blue Ridge Institute, a nonprofit organization based in North Carolina, is a recognized source for NIH funding statistics.

Here are 2013 NIH funding for other Loyola departments, according to the Blue Ridge Institute:

Anatomy/cell biology: $370,320
Biochemistry: $29,173
Internal medicine/medicine: $1,447,390
Microbiology/immunology/virology: $4,836,003
Obstetrics/genecology: $137,176
Orthopaedics: $217,063
Pathology: $1,234,762
Pharmacology: $1,135,555
Physiology: $2,865,807
Public health and preventive medicine: $1,645,078

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Loyola Law School offers online health law courses

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on November 26, 2013

Flicker.com image

Flicker.com image

By Loyola Student Dispatch Staff
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Loyola University Chicago’s School of Law announced Tuesday that it will be offering online courses in health law.
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The online courses, which will begin in June, will focus on the legal, regulatory, political, ethical, and economic aspects of health care delivery. Specific course topics will include health care compliance, health care payment, insurance, life sciences, fraud and abuse, and a seminar on hot topics in health law.
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The online courses are accredited and will count toward a law degree.
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Here is the news release from the university:
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The nationally recognized Beazley Institute for Health Law and Policy at Loyola University Chicago’s School of Law will offer enrollment in its online health law courses to Juris Doctor (JD) students beginning in June 2014. This is the first-ever summer online session and will be open to any law student enrolled in a JD program in the US.
 
Students may choose from a variety of online courses focusing on the legal, regulatory, political, ethical, and economic aspects of health care delivery. Specific course topics will include health care compliance, health care payment, insurance, life sciences, fraud and abuse, and a seminar on hot topics in health law.
 
Loyola’s Beazley Institute for Health Law and Policy has collaborated with leading health care lawyers, industry professionals, and national health law experts to develop some of the most expansive and cutting-edge health law-related curricular offerings in the country. 
 
The online courses will be held over 14-week terms with at least one accelerated option to allow JD students to complete the coursework in seven weeks. The convenient online format will provide students from anywhere in the world the opportunity to be part of Loyola’s health law course offerings.
 
“We are eager to expand our online health law program so that all JD students may take advantage of the many specialized courses that we offer through the convenience of distance learning,” said Larry Singer, director of the Beazley Institute for Health Law and Policy.    
 
The American Bar Association now permits JD students to earn up to four online course credits per term and up to 12 online course credits during law school. Loyola will offer its JD students the opportunity to register for the new courses in March. Students enrolled at other law schools must seek the approval of their law school before registering.
 
The Beazley Institute for Health Law and Policy continues to offer the only online Master of Laws (LLM) in health law degree in the nation. Loyola’s Master of Jurisprudence (MJ) degree for non-lawyers provides professionals in the health care field a working knowledge of the legal, business, and policy forces affecting the industry.   
 
For more information about the new JD health law courses, visit LUC.edu/summerhealthlawonline
 

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