Loyola Student Dispatch

Bringing Breaking News to Loyola University Chicago

Construction closes entrance to Loyola

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on July 9, 2014

Loyola photo.

Loyola photo.

By Loyola Student Dispatch Staff
Construction and campus events are expected to cause traffic congestion the next few days along sections of Loyola University Chicago’s Lake Shore Campus in Rogers Park, the university announced Wednesday.
A campus entrance at Sheridan Road and Kenmore Avenue will be closed beginning Wednesday due to construction. And student orientations and conference events are expected to increase traffic.
The university is suggesting alternative routes and parking in this memo to students, faculty and staff:
Loyola Community,
Due to construction that begins on Wednesday, July 9, Campus Road will be closed at Sheridan Road and Kenmore Avenue. To access the Main Parking Structure, please use Campus Road at Winthrop Avenue. Additionally, we are expecting heavy traffic on campus due to Orientation and conference activity on Thursday, July 10 and Friday, July 11. Normal traffic patterns will resume on Saturday.
We strongly encourage you to park in the Fordham Garage for the remainder of the week and we ask that you give yourself extra time getting into campus on these days.
If you have any questions, please contact Campus Transportation at 773.508.7036.  Thank you for your cooperation.
Warm Regards,
Campus Transportation

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Burger Wars escalate near Loyola

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on July 8, 2014

McDonald's Bacon Clubhouse.

McDonald’s Bacon Clubhouse.

By Loyola Student Dispatch Staff

The Burger Wars near Loyola University Chicago’s Water Tower Campus  has escalated to a new level as McDonald’s was handing out coupons Tuesday morning for discounts on its deluxe sandwich meals.

The battle intensified with the Monday opening of Red Robin Burger Works outlet at 20 E. Chicago Ave. The new outlet is next door to McDonald’s at 10 E. Chicago Ave. Meanwhile Epic Burger, which opened last year, stands a block away at 40 E. Pearson St. Other competition includes a neighboring Chick-fil-A at 30 E. Chicago Ave.

Red Robin features upscale burgers such as, Burnin’ Love, a hamburger topped with fried jalapeño peppers, salsa, pepper-jack cheese, lettuce, tomatoes and chipotle aioli on a jalapeño cornmeal kaiser roll, for $7.49, and the Bleu Ribbon, a burger topped with tangy steak sauce, chipotle aioli, bleu cheese, tomatoes, lettuce and crispy onion straws, for $6.99.

In an apparent volley, McDonald’s was handing customers coupons Tuesday which offered free fries and a drink if they purchased a Bacon Clubhouse Burger or a Premium Crispy Chicken Bacon Clubhouse Sandwich.

There are 17 sit-down Red Robbin Gourmet Burger restaurants in the Chicago suburbs. Red Robin Burger Works is a specialty concept designed for a smaller space in the city. It features a scaled-down menu and fast-casual service with limited seating.

A Red Robin Burger Works recently opened at 328 N. Michigan Ave. in Chicago. Burger Works outlets have also opened in Colorado, Ohio and soon in Washington, D.C.

 

 

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Red Robin Burger Works opens near Loyola

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on July 7, 2014

redBy Loyola Student Dispatch Staff

Loyola University Chicago is bracing for an escalation of “Burger Wars,” as the latest Red Robin Burger Works outlet opened Monday near the school’s Water Tower Campus in Chicago’s Gold Coast.

Red Robin opened in the former Qdoba restaurant at 20 E. Chicago Ave. The new outlet is next door to a McDonald’s, while Epic Burger stands a block away at 40 E. Pearson St. Other competition includes a neighboring Chick-fil-A at 30 E. Chicago Ave.

Red Robin features upscale burgers such as, Burnin’ Love, a hamburger topped with fried jalapeño peppers, salsa, pepper-jack cheese, lettuce, tomatoes and chipotle aioli on a jalapeño cornmeal kaiser roll, for $7.49, and the Bleu Ribbon, a burger topped with tangy steak sauce, chipotle aioli, bleu cheese, tomatoes, lettuce and crispy onion straws, for $6.99.

There are 17 sit-down Red Robbin Gourmet Burger restaurants in the Chicago suburbs. Red Robin Burger Works is a specialty concept designed for a smaller space in the city. It features a scaled-down menu and fast-casual service with limited seating.

A Red Robin Burger Works recently opened at 328 N. Michigan Ave. in Chicago. Burger Works outlets have also opened in Colorado, Ohio and soon in Washington, D.C.

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Suburban teen killed in Uptown shooting

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on July 7, 2014

Site of shooting. Google Maps.

Site of shooting.
Google Maps.

By Loyola Student Dispatch Staff

Chicago police are searching for a gunman who shot and killed a suburban Alsip teen who was sitting inside a car in Chicago’s Uptown neighborhood.

Here is a portion of the story from CBS-2 Chicago:

A man was killed in a shooting early Sunday in the Uptown neighborhood.

Kezon Lamb, 19, was sitting in a vehicle with a female in the 4400 block of North Malden Street about 12:20 a.m. when a gunman walked up and fired shots, authorities said.

Lamb, of the 4100 block of West 127th Street in Alsip, was shot in the back and taken to Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead at 1:05 a.m., authorities said.

Police said the female who also sitting in the vehicle was hit by glass but was not shot.

Read the entire story at CBS-2:    SHOOTING

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Say what? Loyola says fireworks bad for your ears

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on July 2, 2014

stlouis-mo.gov

stlouis-mo.gov

By Loyola Student Dispatch Staff

What’s louder than a power saw, a race car or a rock concert?

Fireworks.

And as the Fourth if July approaches, Loyola University Health System is warning people to protect their ears from fireworks.

Here is a news release from Loyola University Health System:

Summer sounds include much more than crickets chirping. Outdoor concerts, parades, Fourth of July fireworks, public transportation and construction sites all have one thing in common – high decibels of noise.

“Once hearing is damaged, it cannot be repaired,” said Dr. Jyoti Bhayani, a certified audiologist at Gottlieb Memorial Hospital, part of the Loyola University Health System in Maywood, Ill. She has blunt advice about using headphones.

“Hearing aids have yet to become status symbols, so young people need to wise up and turn the volume down on their ear buds.”

Damage to hearing is one component of summertime living that holds dangers that many people often ignore, Loyola experts say. Other things activities be cautious of include:

  • Beginning in early summer, trauma centers around the country see patients injured by fireworks. Hand and finger damage are the most comon types of trauma.
  • Friends and family gathering around a fire pit or camprire must be particularly serious and attentive. Young children can easily get injured around cooking grills.
  • Young children can be particularly susceptible to ear damage from the high volume of thunderous fireworks displays. (You can protect their hearing by watching from farther away from the sound.)

One in 10 Americans – mostly grownups – has hearing loss that affects their ability to understand normal speech. Aging is the most common cause of this condition. However, exposure to excessive noise also can damage hearing in higher pitches.

“Hearing loss due to excessive noise is totally preventable, unlike hearing loss due to old age or a medical condition,” Bhayani said.

Here are the registered levels for common sounds, according to the American Academy of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery:

  • 30 decibels – soft whisper
  • 50 decibels – rain
  • 60 decibels – normal conversation/computer typing
  • 70 decibels – expressway traffic
  • 85 decibels – earplugs are recommended for prolonged exposure at this level
  • 90 decibels – subway, lawn mower, shop tools
  • 100 decibels – chainsaw, snowmobile, drill
  • 110 decibels – power saw
  • 115 decibels – loud rock concert, sandblasting, car horn
  • 130 decibels – race car
  • 150 decibels – fireworks/jet engine takeoff
  • 170 decibels – shotgun

“It is important to know the intensity of the sounds around you,” said Bhayani, who regularly cares for construction and factory workers, frequent air travelers and seniors at Gottlieb Memorial Hospital. “I recommend using hearing protection devices for those who are exposed to excessive, loud noises and musician’s earplugs, which simply attenuate the intensity/loudness without altering frequency response.”

Loud noise destroys ear nerve endings

Three small bones in the middle ear help transfer sound vibrations to the inner ear where they become nerve impulses that the brain interprets as sound.

“When noise is too loud, it begins to kill the hair cells and nerve endings in the inner ear,” Bhayani said. “The louder a noise, the longer the exposure and the closer you are to the noise source, the more damaging it is to your nerve endings, or your hearing.”

As the number of nerve endings decreases due to damage, so does your hearing. Nerve endings cannot be healed or regenerated and the damage is permanent.

Ear bud warning

Use of ear bud headphones may save your ears from being assaulted by the noise of your teenagers’ music or electronic games, but it may be damaging your child’s hearing.

“About 3 in 5 Americans, especially youth, are prone to hearing loss due to loud music being delivered via ear buds,” Bhayani said.

Helpful hearing hints

Here are a few summertime tips:

  • Cover your ears: “Generic, over-the-counter earplugs are inexpensive and can be found at any drugstore,” Bhayani said. “However, they can be custom-made for comfort and durability. Buy earplugs now and keep them handy in wallets, backpacks, briefcases and purses so you can pop them in when noise is loud and continuous.” Bhayani also suggested using a scarf or even covering your ears with your hands to muffle sound.
  • Swimmer’s ear: “Swimmer’s ear is caused by painful membrane swelling due to trapped moisture in the outer ear,” Bhayani said. “Multicolor, customized plugs for swimming are available and a good investment to avoid painful, or costly, ear infections.” After swimming, Bhayani recommended tilting the head to drain water from each ear and gently wiping the outer ear with a towel.
  • Cotton swabs:  Do not use cotton-tipped swabs to clean ears. “Swabs can actually push wax or harmful material farther into ears and many people use them improperly or too forcefully, which can cause pain or damage.”
  • The plane truth: Many air travelers complain about ear discomfort when the plane is taking off or landing. “Yawning, swallowing, chewing gum and sucking on hard candy help to unplug the ears,”  Bhayani said. If yawning and swallowing are not effective, pinch the nostrils shut, take a mouthful of air and direct the air into the back of the nose as if trying to blow the nose gently. This may have to be repeated several times during the plane’s descent.

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Computer stolen from office at Loyola

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on July 1, 2014

By Loyola Student Dispatch Staff

A computer was stolen Sunday from an office in Coffey Hall at Loyola University Chicago’s Lake Shore Campus in Rogers Park, university Campus Safety reports.

Here is the full alert from Campus Safety:

Loyola Community,

Campus Safety is writing to notify you of a burglary that occurred in Coffey Hall around 9:30 a.m. on Sunday, June 29. The offender knocked out the sidelight of an office door, entered the room, and removed a computer.
A suspect has been identified as wandering various buildings on campus and was in Coffey Hall at the time of the burglary. He is described as: male, approximately 5′ 9″, dark complexion, slender build, black mustache, with short braids in his hair. He was last seen wearing dark pants and a white t-shirt, carrying a light-colored backpack, and riding a BMX-style bike on campus.
If you have any further information, please, contact Campus Safety at 773.508.6039.
We remind you to:
  • Always lock your doors.
  • Avoid leaving valuable items out in the open where they can be easily seen.
  • Consider securing smaller items in a drawer or cabinet that can be locked.
Sincerely,
Tom Murray
Chief of Police and Director of Campus Safety

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Loyola doctors discuss “five-second rule”

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on June 27, 2014

When grilling, remember the "five-second rule." cdc.gov image

When grilling, remember the “five-second rule.”
cdc.gov image

By Loyola Student Dispatch Staff

You’ve heard of the “Five-Second Rule.”

You’re grilling a burger.

It falls off the spatula.

It lands on the patio.

You scoop it up and flip it back onto the grill.

You shout: “Five-Second Rule.”

And you tell your guest not to worry about the germs.

Well, the minds at Loyola University Health System spent time mulling over the “five-second rule,” and here’s what they have to say:

MAYWOOD, Ill. – The burger patty that slides off the plate, the ice cream treat that plops on the picnic table, the hot dog that rolls off the grill – conventional wisdom has it that you have five seconds to pick it up before it is contaminated.

Fact or folklore?

“A dropped item is immediately contaminated and can’t really be sanitized,” said Jorge Parada, MD, MPH, FACP, FIDSA, medical director of the Infection Prevention and Control Program at Loyola University Health System. “When it comes to folklore, the ‘five-second rule’ should be replaced with ‘When in doubt, throw it out.’ “

All items that come into contact with a surface pick up bacteria (and dirt!). How much bacteria and what kind of microbes it pick up depends on the type of object that is dropped and the surface it is dropped on, he said.

“If you rinse off a dropped hot dog, you will probably greatly reduce the amount of contamination, but there will still be some amount of unwanted and potentially nonbeneficial bacteria on that hot dog,” said Parada, who admits to employing the five-second rule on occasion. “Maybe the dropped item only picks up 1,000 bacteria but typically the innoculum, or amount of bacteria that is needed for most people to actually get infected, is 10,000 bacteria. Well, then the odds are that no harm will occur. But what if you have a more sensitive system, or you pick up a bacteria with a lower infectious dose? Then you are rolling the dice with your health or that of your loved one.”

And using your own mouth to “clean off” a dropped baby pacifier?

“That is double dipping – you are exposing yourself to bacteria and you are adding your own bacteria to what first contaminated the dropped item. No one is spared anything with this move,” Parada said.

Parada likened this scenario to being burned, with temperature and time being analogous to type and amount of bacteria.

“The hotter the surface, the easier and worse you will be burned – like the more virulent, or harmful, the bacteria, the easier and sicker you may get. One only has to touch a white-hot surface momentarily to get burned and sometimes it doesn’t take a lot of bad bugs for you to get sick. On the other hand, if hold your hand to a less hot surface but do so for a longer period, the more you will be injured, too.”

Parada said there are degrees of risk of contamination.

“So a potato chip dropped for a second on a rather clean table will both have little time to be contaminated and is likely to only pick up a miniscule amount of microbes – definitely a low risk,” he said. On the other hand, food that lands on a potentially more contaminated spot – such as the floor – and stays there for a minute is going to pick up more bacteria and pose a greater risk.

“In the same time period, a rock candy is less likely to pick up contamination than a slice of cheese. As an extreme example, whether it’s a rock candy or a slice of cheese, I don’t think anyone would invoke the five-second rule if it fell in the toilet,” said Parada, a professor at Loyola’s Stritch School of Medicine. “At the end of the day, this is a polite social fiction we employee to allow us to eat lightly contaminated foods,” Parada said.

And that old saw about building up a healthy immune system through exposure?

“There actually is certain research that supports the importance of being exposed to bacteria at critical times in a child’s development,” Parada said. “But I believe this development applies to exposures of everyday living. I do not advocate deliberately exposing ourselves to known contaminants. That would probably be a misplaced approach to building up our defenses. If you want to be proactive in building up your defenses, eat right, exercise and get adequate sleep – and remember to get your vaccines.”

 

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Police hunt drunken drivers in Rogers Park

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on June 26, 2014

By Loyola Student Dispatch Staff

It’s never good to drink and drive.

But this weekend in Rogers Park, drunken drivers have a better chance of getting caught because of a Chicago Police Department dragnet.

Chicago police will conduct a Roadside Safety Check from 7 p.m. on Friday to 3 a.m. Saturday in Rogers Park, according to a police department press release.
During roadside safety checks, police officers slow down traffic, stop cars at regular intervals and watch for drivers who show signs of alcohol impairment and other violations.

Here is the full news release:
ROADSIDE SAFETY CHECK IN THE ROGERS PARK (24TH) DISTRICT
The Chicago Police Department will conduct a Roadside Safety Check in the Rogers Park (24th) District at 6601 N. Western Ave. The Roadside Safety Check will commence at 7:00 p.m. on Friday, June 27, 2014 and end at 3:00 a.m. on Saturday, June 28, 2014. During roadside safety checks, police officers slow down traffic, stop cars at regular intervals and watch for drivers who show signs of alcohol impairment and other violations.

“This program is conducted year round to ensure drivers are operating their vehicles safely,”
said Superintendent, Garry F. McCarthy. “This is part of an ongoing strategy to keep the city
streets safe for Chicago’s residents and commuters.”

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Rogers Park welcomes new grocery today

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on June 24, 2014

By Loyola Student Dispatch Staff
Rogers Park welcomes a new grocery today with the opening of a Jewel-Osco.
Joe Moore, alderman of the 49th Ward, announced that the new Jewel-Osco will open at 5 p.m. Tuesday at the Gateway Center shopping plaza at Clark and Howard Streets.
The Jewel-Osco replaces a Dominick’s Finer foods, which shut its doors late last year as part of a statewide closing of more than 70 stores.

Moore released this alert to residents about the new grocery:

Dear Neighbor,
Don’t forget today is the big day for the Grand Opening of the brand new Jewel-Osco store at Gateway Centre (Howard and Clark streets)! The store officially opens its doors to the public TODAY (Tuesday, June 24th), at 5:00 p.m. A ribbon cutting ceremony will take place at 5:30 p.m.
I encourage everyone to attend the ceremony and welcome Jewel-Osco back to the neighborhood!
Last March I announced the good news that Jewel/Osco would fill the space at Gateway Center formerly occupied by Dominick’s Fine Foods, which closed all their Chicago area stores at the end of last year. Securing a new grocer at the shuttered Gateway location was a top priority of the Mayor Emanuel’s Grocery Store Task Force of which I was an active member.
When you shop at the new store, you’ll probably see some familiar faces working in the aisles and behind the counter. Jewel hired over 80 neighborhood residents to work at the new store thanks in part to my office’s aggressive outreach and my Job Fair last month.  
I look forward to seeing you at the ribbon cutting!
Sincerely,
Joe Moore

 

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49th Ward office sells city vehicle stickers

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on June 23, 2014

By Loyola Student Dispatch Staff
Rogers Park residents can purchase their City of Chicago vehicle stickers this Saturday at the 49th Ward Service Office, according to an alert from Joe Moore, the 49th Ward alderman.
All city residents must purchase and display the new stickers by Tuesday, July 16.
Here is the alert from Moore’s office:
Dear Neighbor,
I am pleased to report the Chicago City Clerk’s office will be selling City Vehicle Stickers at the 49th Ward Service Office, 7356 N. Greenview, this Saturday, June 28th, from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. There is no additional fee for this convenience.
The City begins enforcing the City Vehicle Sticker requirement on Tuesday, July 16th.  Failure to purchase and display the new City Vehicle Sticker by July 16th could result in a $200 ticket and a purchasing late fee.The price of a City Vehicle Sticker depends on the type of vehicle you own. Passenger, large Passenger, small truck, large truck, motorcycle, and antique Chicago City Vehicle Stickers are assigned varying prices. The Chicago City Clerk’s office provides a chart with a list of the 2,500 most popular vehicles on the road today and the corresponding vehicle sticker price.  To access the chart, CLICK HERE.

A vehicle sticker in a residential permit parking zone will cost an additional $25.
This year only, your Chicago City Vehicle Sticker price is prorated by month to set you on your new year-round Chicago City Vehicle Sticker sales renewal month.
Your Chicago City Vehicle Sticker price is based on the length of time your vehicle sticker is valid. When you make your purchase, you will be asked to select between a short-term prorated Chicago City Vehicle Sticker (valid for between one and 12 months), or a long-term extended Chicago City Vehicle Sticker (valid for between 13 and 24 months).
The final 2014 Chicago City Vehicle Sticker cost is determined by multiplying the number of months the vehicle sticker is valid by the monthly price that corresponds with the make, model and vehicle sticker type listed in the chart provided by the City clerk’s office.
Again, these price options are being offered for one time only to set more than one million motorists on a year-round Chicago City Vehicle Sticker sales calendar and end the long lines and headaches associated with the traditional six-week sales season.
Please note, seniors age 65 and older as of Dec. 31, 2014 are exempt from the year-round sales program and will continue to renew on an annual, June-to-June schedule. The cost for a senior Chicago City Vehicle Sticker is $30.34.
Please bring your City Vehicle Sticker renewal form. If you do not have your renewal form, you must bring one of the following VIN approved documents:
• State vehicle registration card, or
• Vehicle title, or
• Insurance card displaying your VIN.
If you are a senior citizen, make sure to bring your driver’s license to receive the senior discount.  If you are purchasing a Chicago City Vehicle Sticker on behalf of a senior citizen, please bring that person’s driver’s license.   
The Clerk’s Office prefers payment by check or money order, but will accept cash or credit card payments.
Keep in mind that even if your vehicle is registered in the suburbs or out-of-state, you may need to purchase a Chicago City Vehicle Sticker. By ordinance, vehicles that are “principally garaged” in the city more than 30 days must display a Chicago City Vehicle Sticker.
As a final inducement to purchasing your city sticker on time, my office staff and I will be handing out free lemonade to everyone who buys a sticker at my office this Saturday!
Sincerely,
Joe Moore

 

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