Loyola Student Dispatch

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Loyola’s Underground Laboratory Theatre hosts “Frankenstein”

Posted by Anna SK Buchanan on March 21, 2013

By Anna Buchanan

Loyola University Chicago’s Department of Fine and Performing Arts will play its new theater production, “Frankenstein” this weekend  in the Underground Laboratory Theatre of Mundelein.

Tickets for the Friday, Saturday and Sunday performances can be purchased here for $6-$8.

Special $5 tickets will be available at the box office for Thursday’s preview performance.

Writer and director, Alexandra Burch, has created a new adaptation of “Frankenstein” that explores the monster’s humanity.

Here is an excerpt from an exclusive interview with Burch about her first experience as a playwright:

“While I was studying abroad in London two years ago, I got really obsessed with writing a play about Ophelia (from Hamlet) traveling through purgatory after her death. The first scene I wrote was her waking up soaking wet in a forest. As she moved and remembered how to use her body, she sucks the water from her own hair because she is thirsty. That particular image stuck with me, and during that same time I felt like the Frankenstein story just kept popping up everywhere I went. As I was rereading it, there was a mega production directed by Danny Boyle going on, and I stumbled on one too many exhibitions on Mary Shelley to be a coincidence. I felt those eerie “sign from the universe” vibes that I had to explore the story somehow.”

Here is additional information from Loyola’s Department of Fine and Performing Arts website about the play:

“Victor Frankenstein’s three-year obsession with the creation of life brings him to the brink of insanity, ending in a human experiment gone horribly awry. Childlike in her innocence but grotesque in form, Frankenstein’s creature is cast out in a hostile world by her maker. Burch’s adaptation follows their parallel journeys as Creature and Maker confront a world filled with not only horror and pain, but also profound humanity.

 

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