Loyola Student Dispatch

Bringing Breaking News to Loyola University Chicago

Archive for October 5th, 2012

Nobel Prize winning psychologist to speak Loyola Law School

Posted by dshabbit on October 5, 2012

Daniel Kahneman

By Dylan Shabbit

Daniel Kahneman, Nobel Prize winning psychologist, economist, and author of the best-selling book Thinking, Fast and Slow, will speak Friday at the Loyola University Chicago School of Law.

Kahneman will be a part of a group made up of scholars, expert witnesses, practitioners, as well as distinguished jurors Hon. William T. Hart, Richard A. Posner, and Jed S. Rakoff, that will debate and discuss the application of behavioral economics to aspects of securities fraud litigation, according to a press release issued by the school.

The conference will take place from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday in the Power Rogers & Smith Ceremonial Courtroom, located on floor 10 of the Phillip H. Corboy Law center at Loyola’s Water Tower Campus.

Expected topics for the conference include pleading and proving market efficiency and the fraud on the market theory of reliance, loss causation, event studies, damage calculations, the appropriate role of experts, and opinion and testimony, according to the press release.

The event will be sponsored by The Loyola University Chicago Institute for Investor Protection
and The Institute for Law and Economic Policy. Attendance will be free and open to the public, and the conference has been approved by the Illinois MCLE Board for six hours of credit.

For more information, visit http://www.luc.edu/law/academics/special/center/investor/symposium.html, or http://blogs.luc.edu/pressreleases/2012/10/03/nobel-prize-winning-psychologist-and-author-daniel-kahneman-to-speak-at-loyola-university-chicago-school-of-law/?date.

To register for this event, RSVP by email to LawInvestorProtection@luc.edu.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,268 other followers

%d bloggers like this: