Loyola Student Dispatch

Bringing Breaking News to Loyola University Chicago

Wrigley Field among structures damaged by storm

Posted by loyolastudentdispatch on February 3, 2011

Wrigley Field damage. Photo by Kara Leslie.

Wrigley Field and a building in Rogers Park were among the structures damaged in this week’s blizzard.

The Chicago-Sun Times has the story and Loyola Student Dispatch reporter Kara Leslie has the photo:

At least six buildings have been damaged by the blizzard — including historic Wrigley Field, where a portion of the roof blew off.

A panel of the Wrigley Field roof above the press box was damaged by extreme winds during the blizzard, Cubs spokesman Peter Chase said.

Part of the panel, made of fiberboard, broke away and the Cubs are working with the city to monitor the situation and to ensure there aren’t any public safety issues, Chase said.

 North Clark and West Addison streets near the ballpark were closed as a precaution. A security guard will remain on site to monitor the situation, officials said.

According to a statement from the city’s Office of Emergency Management and Communications none of the storm damage to buildings poses a threat to the public. Because of the weather the city had not been able to complete an inspection of Wrigley Field as of Wednesday morning.

On the Northwest Side, the awning and pipes blew off a building at 5700 W. Irving Park, the statement said. The owner was on site cleaning up late Tuesday.

A column collapsed in a vacant building at 4759 N. Maplewood and the area was barricaded off with caution tape, officials said.

In Rogers Park, inspectors responded to a report of a sign blowing in the wind at 2733 W. Devon. There were no immediate details on the incident.

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